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Home Made Wild Game Jerky

This Jerky is a GREAT creation ever. Not to be bragging but this is one of the best jerky recipes around! This recipe is for beef but when wild game is available this jerky is outstanding. This is a must try for anyone who loves to have this on hand.

jerky

Ingredients
4 pounds round steak cut into strips no thicker than 1/4 inch (if you freeze the steak a few minutes beforehand, slicing is much easier)
4 tablespoons onion powder
1 1/3 teaspoons black pepper
1 1/3 teaspoons garlic powder
2 pinches sea salt
1 teaspoon dry Italian-style salad dressing mix
1 cup Worcestershire sauce
1 cup soy sauce
1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce

Directions
Mix together in a large bowl, the onion powder, pepper, garlic powder, salt and Italian seasoning.
Stir in Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce and pepper sauce.
Place meat into a container, and combine with marinade.
Cover, and refrigerate and marinate for 24 hours. (use large zip lock storage bags)
Place oven rack on the highest level.
Place aluminum foil on bottom of oven to catch drips.
Preheat oven to 150 degrees F.
Insert round toothpicks through the tops of the strips of meat, and hang them from the oven rack.
Bake in preheated oven for 4 hours, or until dried to desired consistency.
Store finished product in an air tight container.

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Home Made Wild Game Jerky

This Jerky is a GREAT creation ever. Not to be bragging but this is one of the best jerky recipes around! This recipe is for beef but when wild game is available this jerky is outstanding. This is a must try for anyone who loves to have this on hand.

jerky

Ingredients
4 pounds round steak cut into strips no thicker than 1/4 inch (if you freeze the steak a few minutes beforehand, slicing is much easier)
4 tablespoons onion powder
1 1/3 teaspoons black pepper
1 1/3 teaspoons garlic powder
2 pinches sea salt
1 teaspoon dry Italian-style salad dressing mix
1 cup Worcestershire sauce
1 cup soy sauce
1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce

Directions
Mix together in a large bowl, the onion powder, pepper, garlic powder, salt and Italian seasoning.
Stir in Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce and pepper sauce.
Place meat into a container, and combine with marinade.
Cover, and refrigerate and marinate for 24 hours. (use large zip lock storage bags)
Place oven rack on the highest level.
Place aluminum foil on bottom of oven to catch drips.
Preheat oven to 150 degrees F.
Insert round toothpicks through the tops of the strips of meat, and hang them from the oven rack.
Bake in preheated oven for 4 hours, or until dried to desired consistency.
Store finished product in an air tight container.

Follow our FISHING BLOG

WEB   RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

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EASY GROUSE CARBONARA RECIPE

 

Ingredients

10 slices of bacon
3 to 4 cups grouse meat, cut into strips
1 small onion, chopped
1 tsp homemade garlic powder
1 tsp homemade onion powder

Sauce
2-1/2 cups whipping cream
1 tsp homemade garlic powder
1 tsp homemade onion powder
8 egg yolks
1 cup parmesan cheese, grated (not powder)
1/4 cup fresh basil or 3 TBS dried basil
kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

4 oz fettuccine or spaghetti noodles

Directions

In a large heavy skillet, fry bacon until cooked (not crispy); drain and set aside. Fry the grouse meat and onion in the bacon fat until meat is cooked through. Drain well. Discard the bacon fat.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and cook the pasta. (I always put a teaspoon or two of canola or vegetable oil in the water so the pasta doesn’t stick together.)

Meanwhile, in a large saucepan or dutch oven, whisk the sauce ingredients together and slowly heat to medium-low (no higher or the eggs will scramble).

When the meat/onion mixture and pasta is cooked and drained well, add that to the sauce ingredients. Cook until it is thickens and season with more salt and pepper if you need to.

Serve with a salad and crusty butter bread. So delicious.

 
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Posted by on June 29, 2014 in grouse, recipe, Wawang Lake Resort

 

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Grin and Bear it: How to bear eating bear meat.

As an outfitter, we often hear how many people would love to hunt bear but have no idea what to do with all the meat or if they did keep it, how to cook it (Ontario is a no waste province, it is mandatory to take all of the meat with you upon departure.)

Below is an excerpt from a great story written by Jackson Landers and how he dealt with an unexpected amount of bear meat…..and what he learned.

 

 

bearfordinner

Now I had heard all sorts of stories from hunters about what bear meat is like: that it’s tough, gamey, and unpleasantly greasy. But in my experience eating a fairly wide array of unusual species, I had found that meat that tastes “tough and gamey” is more often a case of bad butchering and sloppy handling than an intrinsic quality of a species.

To maximize the potential flavor of my bear, I dry-aged it for a week before I started experimenting. Dry-aging meat, for the uninitiated, is the process of letting meat hang out for a while at cool temperatures while allowing moisture to evaporate from it. Dry-aging accomplishes two things. First, natural enzymes in the meat begin to tenderize it by breaking down the collagen in the muscles. (Collagen is what makes tough meat feel tough, and more of it builds up in muscle tissue as an animal gets older.) Second, dry-aging allows water to evaporate out of a piece of meat, concentrating the flavor. High-end steakhouses all do this with their beef, and I have been dry-aging most of my venison in my fridge at home for years.

Once my bear was sufficiently dry-aged, the very first thing I tried was cutting some simple steaks out of a forequarter (the upper portions of the front legs) and from the backstraps (the cuts from alongside the spine that are referred to as “pork loin” in pigs). I wanted to keep the recipe simple so as not to hide the true flavor of the meat, but I also wanted to have some fun. So I just ran with the bear theme. I pan-seared the steaks in olive oil and drizzled just a bit of honey on them. A handful of blueberries went into the pan with them (bears love blueberries almost as much as they love honey). Then I transferred the meat to a covered dish to finish cooking in the oven and deglazed the pan with a splash of Toasted Head cabernet sauvignon, which I had chosen on account of the wine’s label having a black bear on it. I made sure to cook the meat to 140 degrees and hold it there for a while, since bears, like pigs, can carry trichinosis.

bearroast

My girlfriend and I sat down to eat our first bites of bear meat, drizzled with that red-wine pan sauce. The texture was good, and the backstrap cuts were a bit more tender than the forequarter cuts. The flavor was mild; it tasted more or less identical to venison—which is to say a lot like beef, only with less fat and a blander flavor. There was nothing greasy or tough about it. It looked like a thick piece of filet mignon. Between sips of the bear-bearing Toasted Head wine (which paired very nicely with the bear meat, I should add), we soon forgot that it was bear meat that we were eating. By the end of the meal, it was just dinner, no more exotic than the artichokes we served along with it.

Heartened, I started putting bear meat in everything. And once I began running it through the meat grinder, the stuff became a household staple. Think bear tacos, spaghetti with bear sauce, lime-marinated bear stir-fry served over ramen noodles.

moosestir

Bear burgers in particular were a big hit. I mixed one egg with 1 pound of ground bear meat and just a touch of onion powder and pepper and broiled them under high heat. Three minutes per side seemed to get me up over 140 degrees every time, without taking the burgers beyond medium-rare. I invited some friends over to eat them, and the unanimous agreement was that they simply tasted like very good beef burgers and that nobody would ever guess they were bear.

I began to take the ground bear meat so much for granted that I confess to feeding it to a dinner guest in a ragout over angel hair pasta without thinking to tell her that she was eating bear as opposed to beef. She ate every bite. I’m still not sure whether I should tell her what she ate.

Lately I’ve found myself worrying about the dwindling supply of bear meat in my fridge and freezer. I have one whole hindquarter in my chest freezer awaiting a special bear dinner with a group of friends, but other than that and a pound or so of medallions, all I’ve got left is an array of very unusual bones that my dogs have been chewing on in the front yard. What will I do when I run out?

 

 

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