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Breast of Grouse Monterey Jack

 

grouse mont

You don’t have to do much to a ruffed grouse to bring out the great taste; nor do you want to go too far and overwhelm the natural flavors. This simple but delicious recipe archives the perfect balance.

Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 4 ruffed grouse breasts, butterflied
  • 4 slices Monterey Jack, 1/8-inch thick
  • 1 egg white
  • 1 cup cornflakes, crushed
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil

Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 325°F. Make a slit almost all the way through each breast; fill each slit with 1 slice of cheese.
  • Whisk egg white lightly; brush over outsides of breasts. Press each breast all over into cornflake crumbs until coated.
  • Heat oil in a heavy ovenproof skillet over medium heat; brown breasts, turning once, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer to oven; roast for 10 minutes to finish cooking.

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Posted by on August 11, 2016 in grouse, recipe, Wawang Lake Resort

 

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Grouse Kebobs

2Cubes of ruffed grouse breast skewered along with grape tomatoes, mushrooms and onion make for wonderful kebabs. No ruffies? You can also use other grouse, as well as duck, goose or wild turkey breast meat.

Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 4 ruffed grouse breasts (skinless, boneless)
  • 3 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 cup white wine
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  • 1 red onion, cut into ¾-inch cubes
  • 16 grape tomatoes, whole
  • 16 brown mushrooms, whole
  • Canola oil

Preparation

  • Cut grouse breasts into ¾-inch cubes and place in a zip-lock bag with thyme, olive oil, wine, salt and pepper. Marinate in refrigerator for 30 minutes.
  • Remove grouse from bag and thread onto skewers, alternating with onion cubes, tomatoes and mushrooms. Brush kebabs with canola oil and grill until grouse is cooked through.
  • Serve with fragrant basmati rice and carrot rounds.
  • Tip: If you use wooden skewers, first soak them in water for 15 minutes to help prevent them from splintering or burning. Whether you use stainless steel or wooden skewers, coat them in cooking oil before threading on the grouse and vegetables so the food will easily slide off after grilling. Also coat the grill with cooking oil so the kebabs don’t stick.
  • For the glass: For this tasty light meal, fill your glass with a full-bodied beer or a heavy Chardonnay.

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Posted by on July 21, 2016 in grouse, recipe, Wawang Lake Resort

 

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How to Make Game Stock

One thing you can do to amp your kitchen credibility quickly is learning to make stock—a flavorful cooking liquid that forms the base of many soups, sauces, and other recipes. Making homemade stock from venison bones or bird carcasses not only give your favorite dishes, such as the duck pho in the photo, a flavor boost, but you’ll be get every last scrap of use from your bird or game animal.

duckpho

The stock making process starts with a scrap bag—a gallon-size Ziploc kept in the freezer that collects the trimmings from onions, carrots, celery and other vegetables. (Of course, you can also make stock with fresh ingredients, but this method is kind of like saving your pennies for a rainy day.) A simple stock can be made by adding the ingredients of the scrap bag into a pot with the leftover carcass from a pheasant, grouse, duck, or goose, deer leg bones or other game scraps, covering everything with water and letting it simmer for a short period of time, say 30 minutes to an hour. However, with just a couple more steps and a bit more time (mostly unattended), you can achieve a richer, fuller flavor by roasting the scraps before soaking them.

Here’s a recipe for pheasant stock, but you could easily substitute the pheasant carcass for just about any game bird or whole or cut leg bones from deer, elk, moose, and other venison.

Stock Recipe

Ingredients
– Pheasant carcass or assorted pheasant bones (NOTE:  You can use any game bird)
– 1 cup each of celery, carrot, and onion scraps
– Assorted herbs, including thyme, parsley, and rosemary
– 1 bay leaf
– 12 cups water (or enough to cover pheasant)

Directions:
1. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Place the pheasant bones and vegetables in Dutch oven or heavy, ovenproof stock pot. Place the uncovered pot in the oven and roast for 30 minutes, or until ingredients are browned.

2. Move the pot to the stovetop set the heat to medium-high and add a few cups of water, scraping the bottom of the pan to loosen any browned bits. Cover the pheasant and vegetables with the remaining water, add the herbs and the bay leaf and raise the heat.

3. When the water just starts to boil, remove any scum that has risen to the top. Lower the heat and cover the pot. Simmer slowly for at least 1 hour; two is even better.

4. After a few hours, remove the pot from the heat and let it cool slightly. Remove the bones and vegetables with a slotted spoon and discard. Pour the stock through a cheesecloth-lined strainer or other fine sieve.

You can let the stock sit overnight in the fridge and skim any hardened fat from it the next day, though, with lean birds like pheasants, this generally isn’t necessary.

Stock can be stored for up to a week in the refrigerator or several months, covered, in the freezer.

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How Marinade Works

For some reason, the go-to recipe for wild-game always starts with “Soak (insert game meat here) in Italian dressing for three days.” Seriously, how many times have you heard a hunter say this?

One argument for using marinades is that they help tenderize tough meat. But this is probably the biggest misconception about using marinades, at least if you believe in science.

realmarinade

“When proteins are exposed to an acidic marinade, the bonds break and the proteins unwind. Almost immediately, one unwound protein runs into another unwound protein and they bond together into a loose mesh. This is the same thing that happens when proteins are exposed to heat. At first, water molecules are attached to and trapped within this protein mesh, so the tissue remains juicy and tender. But after a short time, if the protein is in a very acidic marinade, the protein bonds tighten, water is squeezed out, and the tissue becomes tough.”

This and similar studies have also found that the acids used in marinades penetrate meat at the rate of one to two millimeters per day. So even a three-day marinade isn’t going to penetrate much past the surface of the meat. Now, there are marinades that call for enzymes (such as those found in pineapple, papaya and yogurt) rather than acids, and enzymes actually do tenderize meat by breaking down the muscle fibers and the collagen that holds muscles together. However, you have to be very careful when marinating with enzymes as they can make meat mushy rather than just tender.

If a marinade doesn’t tenderize meat, why use it?

Marinades are great for enhancing the flavor of the meat. Note: ENHANCE, not cover up. For game birds, the lighter flavored the marinade the better. Venison and red meat, particularly from older animals, can handle heartier marinades, but again, be careful not to overpower the game.

Because marinades also coat the surface of the meat, they help keep it moist, which is particularly useful for cooking over high-heat, such as grilling or pan-frying.

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Anytime you’re cooking wild-game, it’s a good idea to reserve some marinade for basting. But remember to not reuse marinade that’s had meat soaking in it as your basting. Reserve some liquid separately to prevent cross-contamination.

So what’s the best marinade if it isn’t Italian dressing? That depends on what flavor you’re looking for, but here’s one to use for grilled ruffed grouse breasts. It’s a little sweet and a little salty, with some Asian influence that makes it wonderful for a stir fry or even just grilling and chopping it up to serve in a soup with some noodles. Dress that with some diced jalapeño and some cilantro and it makes a great lunch.

Honey-Ginger Ruffed Grouse Marinade

Ingredients
– 2 tbs. rice wine vinegar
– 2 tbs. honey
– 1 tbs. soy sauce
– 1 tbs. sesame (or olive) oil
– fresh, grated ginger

Directions:
Whisk ingredients together and pour over ruffed grouse breasts. Let marinate 1-2 hours before grilling.

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Grouse Kebobs

2Cubes of ruffed grouse breast skewered along with grape tomatoes, mushrooms and onion make for wonderful kebabs. No ruffies? You can also use other grouse, as well as duck, goose or wild turkey breast meat.

Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 4 ruffed grouse breasts (skinless, boneless)
  • 3 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 cup white wine
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  • 1 red onion, cut into ¾-inch cubes
  • 16 grape tomatoes, whole
  • 16 brown mushrooms, whole
  • Canola oil

Preparation

  • Cut grouse breasts into ¾-inch cubes and place in a zip-lock bag with thyme, olive oil, wine, salt and pepper. Marinate in refrigerator for 30 minutes.
  • Remove grouse from bag and thread onto skewers, alternating with onion cubes, tomatoes and mushrooms. Brush kebabs with canola oil and grill until grouse is cooked through.
  • Serve with fragrant basmati rice and carrot rounds.
  • Tip: If you use wooden skewers, first soak them in water for 15 minutes to help prevent them from splintering or burning. Whether you use stainless steel or wooden skewers, coat them in cooking oil before threading on the grouse and vegetables so the food will easily slide off after grilling. Also coat the grill with cooking oil so the kebabs don’t stick.
  • For the glass: For this tasty light meal, fill your glass with a full-bodied beer or a heavy Chardonnay.

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Posted by on December 23, 2015 in grouse, recipe, Wawang Lake Resort

 

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Grouse Kebobs

2Cubes of ruffed grouse breast skewered along with grape tomatoes, mushrooms and onion make for wonderful kebabs. No ruffies? You can also use other grouse, as well as duck, goose or wild turkey breast meat.

Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 4 ruffed grouse breasts (skinless, boneless)
  • 3 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 cup white wine
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  • 1 red onion, cut into ¾-inch cubes
  • 16 grape tomatoes, whole
  • 16 brown mushrooms, whole
  • Canola oil

Preparation

  • Cut grouse breasts into ¾-inch cubes and place in a zip-lock bag with thyme, olive oil, wine, salt and pepper. Marinate in refrigerator for 30 minutes.
  • Remove grouse from bag and thread onto skewers, alternating with onion cubes, tomatoes and mushrooms. Brush kebabs with canola oil and grill until grouse is cooked through.
  • Serve with fragrant basmati rice and carrot rounds.
  • Tip: If you use wooden skewers, first soak them in water for 15 minutes to help prevent them from splintering or burning. Whether you use stainless steel or wooden skewers, coat them in cooking oil before threading on the grouse and vegetables so the food will easily slide off after grilling. Also coat the grill with cooking oil so the kebabs don’t stick.
  • For the glass: For this tasty light meal, fill your glass with a full-bodied beer or a heavy Chardonnay.

Follow our FISHING BLOG

WEBSITE    RATES     FISH    HUNT    CABINS    PHOTOS
TESTIMONIALS    BROCHURE    HUNT BOOKLET

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Posted by on October 3, 2015 in grouse, recipe, Wawang Lake Resort

 

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Breast of Grouse Monterey Jack

 

grouse mont

You don’t have to do much to a ruffed grouse to bring out the great taste; nor do you want to go too far and overwhelm the natural flavors. This simple but delicious recipe archives the perfect balance.

Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 4 ruffed grouse breasts, butterflied
  • 4 slices Monterey Jack, 1/8-inch thick
  • 1 egg white
  • 1 cup cornflakes, crushed
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil

Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 325°F. Make a slit almost all the way through each breast; fill each slit with 1 slice of cheese.
  • Whisk egg white lightly; brush over outsides of breasts. Press each breast all over into cornflake crumbs until coated.
  • Heat oil in a heavy ovenproof skillet over medium heat; brown breasts, turning once, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer to oven; roast for 10 minutes to finish cooking.

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1 Comment

Posted by on August 7, 2015 in grouse, recipe, Wawang Lake Resort

 

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