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Monthly Archives: September 2016

Moose Hunting at Wawang Lake

Deeply imbedded in the Canadian Boreal Forest we offer the very finest in Moose habitat for our hunters.  Look no farther than Wawang Lake for accommodations for your next BIG game hunt!

WawangMoose

Our hunts accommodations ONLY for Ontario Resident Moose Hunters.

If your looking for a great hunting area that has a high population of moose then look no farther than Wawang Lake Resort as we’re in the middle of the best moose hunting area in all of NW Ontario.

At Wawang Lake we offer comfortable accommodations to Resident Ontario Moose Hunters only.  Presently we don’t have any tags available and unable to take any non-resident hunters during the Moose Hunt season.

Things Moose Hunters Should Consider:

Crossbows
• Draw length must be al least (11.8 in.)
• Draw weight must be at least (119 lbs.)
• Bolt head must be at least (0.9 in.) at the widest point, and there must be at least two cutting edges of straight, sharp, un-serrated, barbless steel.

Longbows
• Draw weight must be at least (48.5 lbs.) at draw length of (27.6 in.) or less.
• Arrow length must be at least (23.6 in.).
• Broad head must be at least (0.9 in.) at the widest point, and there must be at
least two cutting edges of straight, sharp, un-serrated, barbless steel.

Rifle
We suggest using at the minimum one of the following:
300 Magnum
30-06
7MM Magnum with bullet weights in the 180 grain range
A rim-fire rifle, a shotgun smaller than 20 gauge when loaded with shot, or any shotgun loaded with shot smaller than SG or No. 1 buck cannot be used for hunting Moose.


Clothing requirements
During the rifle season hunts, a minimum of 400 square inches of uninterrupted Hunter Orange must be worn at all times.  Camouflage or open mesh orange does not meet these requirements.  An orange jacket or vest as well as an orange hat do meet these requirements.

Hunters should also have a compass or hand held G.P.S., as well as a good pair of binoculars, thermos, flashlight, lighter, warm clothing, good quality rain gear, waterproof insulated boots, gloves/mitts, long underwear.   Two-way portable radios are also recommended.  Fall hunting weather can be warm & dry to cold, wet and snowy within a few hours; so it is best to be prepared for all variables.

We trust that this information will prove to be useful in planning your next Big Game Hunt in beautiful, exciting NW Ontario.  We invite you to enjoy our ‘True Wilderness Hospitality’ while participating in a remote hunting experience.

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Posted by on September 29, 2016 in moose, moose hunting, Wawang Lake Resort

 

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What is Solunar and Why is it Helpful?

The Solunar Theory is a hypothesis that animals and fishes move according to the location of the moon in comparison to their bodies. The theory was laid out in 1926 by John Alden Knight, but was said to be used by hunters and fishermen long before the time it was published.

History

1063326111In May 1926, John Aldenn Knight put together some fishing folklore and other fishing factors such as the sun and the moon, hence the name Solunar (Sol for sun and Lunar for moon) to form a theory on the patterns of animal movement. Knight compiled a list of factors which control or influence the day-to-day behavior of many freshwater and saltwater fish. Each one of the 33 different factors were considered. All but 3 were rejected.

The three factors retained were the sun, the moon and the tide. For salt water fishing, tides have long been known as a factor which control fishes’ behavior. As Knight’s research progressed, he found that rather than just tides themselves, the relationship of the moon and sun’s positions relative to each other may be the determining factor.

In addition to the time of moon up (moonrise) – moon down, his research determined that there were intermediate times of the day that occurred in between the two major periods. From that he establishes that there were major periods (moon up – moon down) and minor periods. Knight published the first Solunar table in 1936.

Tables

Solunar tables are tables that fishermen and hunters use to determine the best days of the month and times of the day for catching fish and hunting game. For fishermen, the tides, sunrise and sunset are helpful times of the day to know when the fish are going to bite. For hunters, the tides are not a factor.

Hunters use the sun and the moon to determine when the game will be moving the most.”Other conditions not being unfavorable, fish will feed, animals will move about, birds will sing and fly from place to place, in fact, all living things will become more active, more alive, during Solunar periods than at other times of apparent equal value. …anglers have found that it is a guide to the best fishing of each day, and the quality of their sport has improved…”

Using these tables, a fishermen and a hunter can tell when the moon is directly underfoot and overhead. The strongest activity occurs when there is a full moon or a new moon and is weakest when there is a quarter moon and a three quarter moon. This is because the moon and the sun’s gravitation force is strongest when directly above or directly below our head. The lunar data humans receive is better now because of the newer technology the US Naval Observatory and GPS technology.

This new technology has allowed the Solunar Theory to generate hunting and fishing times with much greater precision It is important to note that data in tables found on various websites should be reverified periodically with US Naval Observatory available data as well as compared against other reputable solunar data providers. Inconsistencies abound due to the complex nature of the Astrophysics computations and overlooked associated anomalies checking that are required to produce useful results. Moon Transits which do not occur for more than a day or associated times being off more than a few minutes are indications of a fundamental issue for a given position and should be suspect.  All data providers should be verified before assuming data presented is authoritative or accurate.

Go to http://www.solunarforecast.com to create your own solunar calendar 🙂

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Posted by on September 27, 2016 in trip planning, Wawang Lake Resort

 

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Baking Soda to Cover Your Scent

Baking soda, the same stuff that deodorizes the fridge and is the key to scent-control system before a hunt.

CN7BBG empty box on white background

Take a soda shower.
The stuff can rub your skin raw if you use it straight, so mix a few tablespoons with some liquid no-scent soap.  Sometimes showering with straight unscented soap, can still leave an odor.

Make a soda-and-clothes lasagna style.
Use baking soda like any other powdered detergent to wash your clothes. Dry them, lay a few items in a plastic tote, sprinkle a layer of soda on that, put in another layer of clothing, sprinkle more soda, and so on until the tote is full. Then place an open box of baking soda in with the clothes and seal the tote up.

Sprinkle your boots.
Obviously, your feet are one of the smelliest body parts because they’re constantly sweating inside your boots,   If boots are wet with perspiration after a hunt, put them on a boot dryer and then sprinkle in some baking soda.  You’ll have very few animals cut your track after applying this tip.

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Grouse Hunting at Wawang Lake

Join Us For Some Exciting and Thrilling Grouse Hunting
INFO & RATES 

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Grouse Season:  September 15th to Oct 31st

Grouse hunting is a relaxing pastime that is getting more and more popular every year.  In our area bird hunting can be an adventure in itself!  Driving down the back roads & trails in your truck or on your ATV can not only be thrilling but breathtaking as well as you wander down roads that are in full color deserving of natures fall foliage. Just taking in these magnificent fall colors, peaceful wilderness & the wildlife that you’ll encounter will make you feel like you are definitely “North of the Tension Zone”.

The bush trails with the rise of the birds, singing of the guns, the smell of the pines along with friendly comraderie back at the camp will not long be forgotten.

Surrounding Wawang Lake are hundreds of miles of ATV trails, old logging road, game animal trails and hiking trails. The bush is just stuffed with these upland game birds and on a sunny fall afternoon you will see hoards of them. Many of our guests choose a fishing / grouse hunting combination package and spend half the their time taking advantage of the awesome northern pike and walleye fishing and spend the rest of their time enjoying the clean fall area and exploring the many trails where birds are plentiful.

There are three species of grouse found in Ontario.

Ruffed Grouse  –  Spruce Grouse  –  Sharptail Grouse

Ruffed Grouse is the most common and comprises of 80% of what you will encounter during your hunt.

The limit for grouse in Ontario is 5 birds per day in any combination of species with a total of 15 in your possession and you will be surprised at the number of grouse we do have and how fast you’ll bag those limits.

Compared to other areas the grouse cycle in our area has remained consistently high over the years and we credit this because of less human population that other places are known for.  In a nutshell what you’ll experience at Wawang Lake is a vast area of complete privacy during your hunt.

The most popular guns for grouse hunting are .410 or 20 gauge shot gun and some hunters use a 12 as well.   Quickly becoming more popular is BOW HUNTING for birds.  To increase the thrill and excitement of your hunt give your bow a try and the challenge alone is sure to thrill you.

Blaze orange hat & vest is required and must be worn out in the field

Canadian Firearms Regulations
All Firearms (does NOT include bows) being brought into Canada must be registered at the Canadian Customs at the time of entry into Canada. A one-year permit costs $50.00 Canadian, or there is a long term permit as well. If you would like further information, you can visit the Canadian Firearms Website through the link on our website or call toll free, 1-800-731-4000.

Canadian Customs
You should be aware of special customs and immigration issues whenever traveling to another country. For people with prior legal issues (including DWI’s) you need to find out what restrictions may be placed on your travel. Visit the Border Crossing Link and/or the Canada Citizenship & Immigration.

DEPOSIT REQUIREMENTS
A $150.00 non-refundable deposit is required at the time of reservation to guarantee a hunt. Balance to be paid in full upon arrival at the resort.  Hunting deposits and installments are non-refundable. Consideration may be given to date transfers if vacancy can be filled.

There are a limited number of spaces available for our hunts. Often there are more guests interested in hunting than there are available spaces, and hunts are often booked a year or more in advance. It is extremely difficult to fill spaces that become available due to cancellation. For these reasons we ask that our guests do not book hunts lightly

INFO & RATES

For further information, or, to book your next bear hunt please contact us at:
1-888-534-9217 or EMAIL

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Recipe: Sausage and Slaw Soup

Here’s a simple take on a sausage-based soup that’s sure to satisfy your pallet after a brisk day of hunting. To make things even easier, you can cheat and go with a bag of pre-chopped slaw mix from the grocery store.

slaw soup

Sausage and Slaw Soup

Ingredients
– ½ pound sliced sausage
– 1 Tbsp. canola oil
– 1 medium onion, chopped
– 4 garlic cloves, minced
– 1 ½ lb. bag of pre-packaged slaw mix
– 1 tsp. salt
– 1 Tbsp. flour
– 1 cup water
– 2 cups beef broth
– 1 Tbsp. red pepper flakes
– 2 tsp. each dried parsley and dill

Directions:
1. Over a medium-high burner, heat the oil in a saucepan or soup pot. Add the sausage to the oil and cook until brown.  . Add the onions and cook until translucent, about 3 to 4 minutes.

2. Stir in the garlic and slaw mix to the saucepan. Cook, stirring frequently, until the cabbage is wilted. Sprinkle the salt and flour over the onions and cabbage and stir.

3. Add the water, broth, and red pepper flakes. Raise heat and bring just to the point of boiling. Reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes.

4. Stir in the parsley and dill. Serve with a thick slice of crusty bread.

ENJOY!!

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Posted by on September 21, 2016 in meat, preparation, recipe, Wawang Lake Resort

 

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How to Judge Your Shooting Distance

 A great article by Kevin Wilson

Accurately judging distance is the first step toward proper shot placement. Instinctive or calculated, bowhunters rely on it for close range shooting. Gun hunters count on their ability to estimate longer distances. Over time we all learn our own tricks for calculating distance but with the advent of laser rangefinders many of us won’t leave home without them. Regardless of how you go about it, determining yardage can make or break your hunt.

I will remember one hunt as long as I live. The outcome was downright depressing all because I misjudged the distance. It happened 16 years ago. I was a neophyte bowhunter at the time. I’d set up a treestand in a small block of trees that I knew held several bucks and does. The previous winter I’d picked up some huge sheds that taped out at 183 Boone & Crockett inches. Knowing that the gigantic buck had survived the winter, my hopes ran high and I knew there was always a chance he’d show up in the timber I was hunting. As luck would have it 45 minutes after climbing into my stand I heard leaves crunching underfoot. Straining to look through the trees, sure enough a smaller basket rack buck was making his way toward my stand. Always an impressive sight I enjoyed the view as he walked 10 yards from me. Then I heard more rustling in the leaves and looked over to see him. He was nothing short of magnificent! Based on his sheds, it looked like he’d grown at least another 15 inches putting him well into the high 190’s – a buck of a lifetime in anyone’s books! He walked 12 yards from my stand but I couldn’t get to full draw with him in plain view. As soon as he turned I capitalized. At full-draw, I locked my 20 yard pin on his body as he continued to amble forward. Walking straight away there was no shot opportunity at all! By the time he stopped, I estimated he was standing at 30 yards. With all the concentration I could muster, I focused and released. The arrow flew where I’d aimed, in perfect alignment with his chest, but literally inches high splitting the hair on his back! Completely awestruck and in total disbelief, that gut-wrenching feeling overcame me as I watched my world-class archery whitetail bound away never to be seen again… and all because I’d misjudged the distance!

Since that day I have made it my lifelong mission to learn how to accurately judge distance. From capitalizing on today’s technologically advanced laser range finding devices to using topographic characteristics to assist in calculating distance, and understanding the influences of terrain, it is an ongoing practice in my world. Regardless of whether you’re an archer or a rifleman, here are a few considerations that might help you as you learn to accurately judge distances.

The Technological Solution
Today’s technology is a saving grace for hunters. Many of us won’t leave home without our laser rangefinder. Portable and easy to use, we simply identify our target, adjust the setting, point, hit the button and, voila! … distance is displayed on the screen. With yardage confirmed, all that remains is the shot itself.

When I began bowhunting nearly two decades ago rangefinders had a simple dial that brought the target image into focus when the dial was turned. Wherever the dial ended up, that was your yardage. Today, thanks to innovation, laser rangefinders are readily available and relatively affordable. In fact today there is really no reason not to use a rangefinder. Many manufacturers have their own versions, but in my opinion, one of the latest and greatest inventions is Bushnell’s Laser Arc. I’ve got the Elite 1500 model. The ARC stands for Angle Range Compensation. While traditional rangefinders are precision optical instruments designed to be used on a level plain (line of sight), the ARC rangefinder compensates for angles from a treestand for instance, or up or down a mountain slope. I have owned and used several different kinds of rangefinders over the years. The Laser ARC is my absolute favorite. Using digital technology, it has a built-in inclinometer that displays the exact slope angle from +/- 60º of elevation with +/- 1.0 degree accuracy. Hunters have always struggled with extreme uphill and downhill angles. These severe angles alter true horizontal distance to the target. The ARC solves this problem. It has three primary settings: bow mode, rifle mode, and a regular mode (for line of sight distance calculation only).

It has a bow mode that displays line of site distance, degree of elevation, and true horizontal distance from 5-99 yards (or meters). For longer range shooters, it also has a rifle mode that calculates and displays the amount of bullet drop, at the target in inches (or centimeters). In the rifle mode, the amount of bullet drop is determined by the line of sight distance to the target, degree of elevation, along with the specific ballistic characteristics of the caliber and ammunition. As the hunter ranges the target, the line of sight, degree of elevation, and bullet-drop/holdover in inches or centimeters is displayed from 100-800 yards (or meters). Here’s where the technology shines ballistically. In the start-up menu, one of eight ballistic groups can be selected by the user, with each formula representing a given combination of caliber and loads.

Laser rangefinding technology, and the ARC system in particular, is invaluable but what if we don’t have one? Then it comes down to a matter of practice and estimation to determine our downrange distances.

Practice
For most of us, learning to judge distance takes considerable practice. Only by doing it a lot, and under variable conditions, can we become competent at it. Shooting is a lot like golf. Understanding how your bow or gun works (i.e., trajectory and ballistics) and interpreting the size of the target animal relative to the terrain can only be learned through firsthand repetitive experience. So how do we get all this supposed experience when we can only take a finite number of animals each year? The answer lies in visiting the gun or archery range.

For bowhunters, nothing beats practice on the 3D course. Today’s 3D targets, like those made by MacKenzie, are very lifelike and offer as realistic practice as you’re likely to get anywhere. Most are made to scale and can be strategically placed in any range situation to simulate realistic hunting scenarios. On my local 3D course, our club uses everything from coyote targets to whitetailed deer, mountain goat, elk, moose, wild hog, turkey and more. Some are set at long distances over 60 yards through wide open clearings while others are placed in the trees, often with very small shooting windows at closer distances like 20 or 30 yards. Most 3D ranges have a good assortment of field scenarios to allow practicing archers to hone their skills.

Likewise, rifle and muzzleloader hunters should visit the range regularly to hone shooting skills. Unfortunately due to the expansive nature of bullets today’s 3D targets aren’t an option. Alternatively silhouettes are. Most rifle ranges offer variable range distances from 100 to 400 yards. At my club our furthest distance is 600 yards. Unless you’re really into the long range thing 400 yards is a stretch for most big game hunters. By shooting repeatedly at 100, 200, 300, and 400 yards, we grow accustomed to what those distances look and feel like. By taking note of the size of target in our scope at specified magnifications we can also learn to estimate distances. For example, at 10x zoom on my Leupold scope, I know that a deer will fill a certain percentage of the field of view. By acknowledging how much of the animal is in the field of view, I can guess the approximate yardage with relative accuracy. Likewise, at 200 and 300 yards, that deer will appear smaller respectively.

Break Distances into Increments
Whether we’re hunting remote regions or in farmland things like trees, rocks, fence posts, and power poles can be used to aid in judging distances. As an archer I’ve learned to make a mental note of things like trees, shrubs, rocks or other physical land-based objects at 10 yard increments out to a distance of 50 yards from where I’m sitting. By burning those objects into my memory I’m better able to make quick decisions when an animal steps into a shooting lane. I’m guessing it may be the same throughout North America but where I do much of my hunting I’ve learned that power poles are set at a standard distance of 100 yards apart. Any time I’m hunting a wide open power line or in farm country I can use those power poles as markers to estimate yardage. As a rule, regardless of what kind of weapon you’re hunting with, breaking distances down into increments simplifies things. Remember, if you’re sitting in a stationary stand or ground blind there is always the option of setting out yardage markers at desirable increments, e.g., every 10 yards.

Consider Where and What You’re Shooting
Judging distances on the open prairies is a very different game than judging distance in the dense forest. Likewise, estimating the distance of a large target like a moose can be tricky if you’re more accustomed to looking at antelope. Dense cover and the size of the animal can play tricks on your mind.

As an archer, I spend most of my time hunting heavy mixed forest areas comprised of aspens and evergreens. Rarely do I see deer, moose or elk at distances further than 80 yards unless its down a long open cutline or across a clear cut. So, whenever I head out to different states or provinces to hunt smaller species like pronghorn antelope, it usually takes some time to acclimatize and recalibrate my brain to accurately judge distances. In my experience, smaller big game species in open terrain tend to appear further away while larger species under heavy cover often look closer than they really are. Unfortunately there are no set rules here; you just need to figure out what works best for you under variable conditions.

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Quartering Your Moose For Transport (with video)

 

Here is a fantastic how to video for quartering a moose for transport.  It isn’t unusual to have a moose down where removing it with this method is mandatory.  Great care must be taken of any wild game to ensure there is no spoilage and that no waste is had.

Enjoy!

If you are an Ontario resident and would like more information regarding our accommodations for the 2016 season, please feel free to contact us 🙂

moosehuntersjpg

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Posted by on September 17, 2016 in moose, Wawang Lake Resort

 

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