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Monthly Archives: July 2016

Develop Proper Archery Form

 

SONY DSCPictured here is perhaps the most popular position of the feet when it comes to shooting; the “Open Stance”. It is easy to perform and opens up the shooter to the target resulting in less interference with clothing from the bowstring.

Despite the fact that you may be shooting the most highly tuned bow, adorned with top of the line accessories, if your shooting form is bad your accuracy will likely be worse. Shooting with good form requires mastering a number of processes. However, once these processes are understood and learned, shooting with proper form will be as easy as walking across the floor; it will become second nature.

Before incorporating the following steps into your shot routine, be sure that you are shooting a well tuned bow set at the appropriate draw length.SONY DSC

Proper Shooting Stance
Where you place your feet during the shot process can have a great bearing on where your arrow strikes. By nature, your body has a natural centering point. If your feet are not positioned properly you might find yourself being pulled away from this centering point. As a result, the body will fight to return to this location. Unfortunately, this can occur during the shot which will impede accuracy.

Resist the urge to grip your bow. Instead, let your fingers naturally drop around the handle and riser. This will eliminate unwanted tension and bow torque making your shots more accurate.

There are 3 basic stance positions to consider. They are as follows.
  • Squared Stance:  Feet are in-line with one another, drawing a line perpendicular to the target.
  • Closed Stance:  Front foot is forward from the front of the body
  • Open Stance:  Front foot is slightly pointing toward the target.The best stance, regardless of which you choose, should be comfortable and solid. This starts by placing your feet about shoulders-width apart with your body weight distributed between the midsection and rear of your feet.

Most bow hunting experts will suggest an open stance which starts by positioning your toes 90 degrees to the target, and then taking a half-step backward with the foot that is closest to the target. This stance will essentially place the chest more toward the target and allow for greater bowstring clearance along the bow arm and chest.

However, this stance may not be for everyone. In order to find your perfect stance, enlist the help of a friend and simply close your eyes and draw your bow while facing a archery target with a wide back 1wall, anchoring as you normally would. With your eyes still closed, move your body and feet around until you find the most comfortable position. Then, open your eyes and note the direction of your aim.

When it comes to hauling back the bowstring, don’t rely on the small bicep muscles of the arm. Instead, use the larger, more stable muscles of the upper back and shoulder. Not only can these muscles pull more weight, they are also steadier and fatigue less quickly.

Let down the bow and reference the position of your feet by pointing an arrow straight at the aiming spot. You have just found your stance.

SONY DSCCorrect Bow Grip
When it comes to gripping the bow you want to do so in such a way that hand torque is not promoted. In other words, you want your grip to be as torque-free as possible. To do this, you first need to find the best location for the grip to contact your hand. This can easily be accomplished with a simple test.

First, take your bow hand and hold it out as if you were going to grip the bow; keeping it slightly open and rigid to imitate pressure being applied to it. Next, take your thumb from your other hand and push it into your bow hand at different locations. You will notice that every location you push with your thumb causes your bow hand to move or collapse—-except one. That one spot is where you want to place the pressure of the bows grip while at full draw.

Your bow arm shoulder should be down and in a “locked” position while at full draw. This makes it more difficult to flex the bow arm causing shot-ruining muscle tension.

This location is typically where the bones in the forearm butt up against the base of the palm. It is a bone-to-bone contact point and is the most reliable, torque-resistant location in which to place the bow grip.

When grabbing the bow, place a small amount of tension on the string, just enough to feel it in your bow hand. Then position the grip into the area you discovered by pressing your thumb into your palm. Now you are ready to draw the bow. Just remember, upon reaching full draw, your bow hand should remain relaxed with your fingers falling down or dangling around the front of the riser.

Drawing the Bow
This may seem like a trivial facet to good shooting, but drawing the bow properly incorporates all of the essential muscles needed in order to shoot with good form; mainly, the back muscles. One of the easiest ways to do this is to think of your drawing arm elbow as having a hook in it. When drawing the bow, start with your elbow about as high as your jaw line. Then, imagine someone has a string attached to the hook that is in your elbow. Now, think about them pulling your elbow straight back as you draw your bow. Instead of puling with your biceps, you will notice that you are actually drawing the bow by using the larger muscles of the upper back; specifically, the rhomboid muscles. This will allow you to relax the rest of your body and pull through the shot using only your back.

SONY DSCBow-Arm Position
A steady aim equals comfortable shooting and tighter arrow groups. A relaxed bow hand is the key to this. To acquire this it is imperative that your drawing side shoulder be down and in a locked position during the shot. Positioning the shoulder in such a manner will greatly reduce muscle tension which is the root of poor aiming. Before drawing the bow, lean slightly toward the target, then start the drawing process. This will place the shoulder in a low, locked, “bone to bone” position.

When it comes to where you place your release-hand, choose and area along the face/jaw-line that is easily repeatable and consistent; your shooting will likewise follow. Hunter shown wearing Lost Camo.

Anchor Position
Consistency is the cornerstone to good shooting. The best location to anchor your bowhand is somewhere along the jawbone that provides the most stable platform. In other words, choose a spot that allows your hand, knuckles, etc. to rest solidly as you release the trigger of your release or let go of the bowstring.

A good tip is to locate this spot with your eyes closed, without looking through the peep sight. Then, once your anchor point has been established, with your head in a natural, upright position, you can open your eyes and adjust the peep sight to your eye, instead of adjusting your eye to the peep sight.

The bottom line is to find an easy-to-repeat anchor point; one that will be consistent and second nature when shooting under pressure or any other time.

TIf good shooting form and posture are present, your body should resemble the letter “T” when viewed from behind. Hunter shown wearing Lost Camo.

Establishing T-Form
The easiest way to confirm that proper draw length and comfortable shooting posture are being used is to look for the “T-Form” as the archer is at full draw. This is easily recognized while looking at the shooter from behind. When doing so, his/her body will represent the shape of a “T”.

The torso should be vertically straight, with a direct line running up and down through the spinal column. The horizontal line in the “T” should run from the bow-side elbow, through the shoulders, and across to the drawing elbow. The trick to establishing this “T” form is to make sure that your drawing elbow isn’t too high or too low. Ideally, it should be about the same height as your ears while at full draw. This will promote the use of back muscles to draw and execute the shot.

Include these simple steps into your shouting routine and watch as your accuracy improves and your confidence soars not only on the 3D archery range, but in the field as well.

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Moose Stir Fry

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This delicious moose dish is low in fat. The amount of each ingredient is proportional to how many people you’re serving. Using half a pound of moose, as this recipe does, makes two large servings.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 lb. moose steak
  • 1/2 cup carrots
  • 1/2 cup bean sprouts
  • 1/4 cup celery
  • 1/2 cup snow peas
  • 1/2 cup broccoli
  • 1/4 cup unsalted peanuts
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp crushed red pepper
  • 1 tbsp cumin
  • Cooked noodles (excluding seasoning packet)

Preparation

  • Slice steaks cross grain and marinade in soy sauce for one day. Throw a little oil into a hot wok to avoid sticking. Stir in moose for about 1 minute.
  • Add other ingredients, including seasoning, stirring frequently. Add additional soy sauce to coat all ingredients.
  • Stir in noodles and serve immediately.

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Posted by on July 29, 2016 in moose, recipe, Wawang Lake Resort

 

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Portable Kitchen – Packsack

grub_hub_+camp_kitchen

For many outdoor enthusiasts on this planet camping is still an popular activity. But being out in the wilderness doesn’t have to mean sacrificing all the amenities we take for granted at home. The Grub Hub is a portable kitchen that’s been around for a few years, but we’ve only now discovered.

It packs everything, and yes, even the kitchen sink. No, this isn’t just a bad play on words: it does come with its own sink for washing your dirty dishes. Aside from holding your stove (not included), there are compartments to hold your pots and pans, telescoping rods to hang your lanterns or anything else that can be hung, and even 9 square feet of table surface for you to prepare your meals on.
grub_hub
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Moose Hunting – After the Hunt

moose-wawang-lakeHunters who take a moose and are camping out often have a feast—chunks of prime meat roasted on sticks over a campfire—a delicious and savory reward for their hard work. Butchering one of these big, heavy animals takes a lot of time and effort. A prime bull can yield more than 500 pounds of meat and fat. Traditional foods include many other edible parts of the moose such as the head, liver, heart, some other internal organs, and the highly valued fat. So it takes not only a lot of work to butcher a moose, but also specialized skills and a detailed knowledge of the animal’s anatomy.

 

moose=wawang-lakeA Delicious Feast

Moose meat and fat are staple foods in most many people who live in the northern regions of Ontario.

Fat is a very important part of a traditional diet because it stokes the metabolism and adds flavor to meat and organs. Unlike beef, moose meat is not marbled with fat, but rather the fat is separate. A favorite kind of fat is found in the sheath-like mesentery membranes that hold the organs together.

In times past, even the bones of moose were ground and boiled to make a fatty broth. If they didn’t use the bones immediately, they could store them as a potential source of food during times of scarcity.

Delectables include brisket, short ribs, heart, and tongue. Thin slices of meat may be fried. A delicious gravy is made from the fat.

A regular favorite is moose meat simmered in a big pot along with some combination of rice, noodles, or potatoes and sometimes vegetables. The result is a thick meaty, delicious stew. Bone marrow is also used in tasty, nutritious broths.

moose=wawang-lake

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How to Use Your Knife

How to Use Your Knife

knife-wawang-lake

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Posted by on July 23, 2016 in How to Use a Knife, knives

 

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Grouse Kebobs

2Cubes of ruffed grouse breast skewered along with grape tomatoes, mushrooms and onion make for wonderful kebabs. No ruffies? You can also use other grouse, as well as duck, goose or wild turkey breast meat.

Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 4 ruffed grouse breasts (skinless, boneless)
  • 3 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 cup white wine
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  • 1 red onion, cut into ¾-inch cubes
  • 16 grape tomatoes, whole
  • 16 brown mushrooms, whole
  • Canola oil

Preparation

  • Cut grouse breasts into ¾-inch cubes and place in a zip-lock bag with thyme, olive oil, wine, salt and pepper. Marinate in refrigerator for 30 minutes.
  • Remove grouse from bag and thread onto skewers, alternating with onion cubes, tomatoes and mushrooms. Brush kebabs with canola oil and grill until grouse is cooked through.
  • Serve with fragrant basmati rice and carrot rounds.
  • Tip: If you use wooden skewers, first soak them in water for 15 minutes to help prevent them from splintering or burning. Whether you use stainless steel or wooden skewers, coat them in cooking oil before threading on the grouse and vegetables so the food will easily slide off after grilling. Also coat the grill with cooking oil so the kebabs don’t stick.
  • For the glass: For this tasty light meal, fill your glass with a full-bodied beer or a heavy Chardonnay.

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Posted by on July 21, 2016 in grouse, recipe, Wawang Lake Resort

 

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Wild Mushrooms

The main edible find in our region is  lobster mushrooms, Hypomyces lactifluorum, in some pretty good quantities. On any hunt, it’s good to bring home dinner, but one doesn’t typically expect to bring home a bundle of lobsters too late into the fall.

lobster-mushrooms-wawang-lake

Typically, by the end of August and into September the brush is filled with mushrooms, edible and not. Unlike spring hunting, fall hunting in and around our area is more mushroom identifying than actually trying to find mushrooms growing. But some year the lobsters can account for a major harvest.

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So on your next trip out into our region whether you’re fishing or grouse hunting be sure to hike the old logging roads in search of these very delicious mushrooms.  Stay tuned for a great recipe that easy to prepare.

 

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Baking Soda to Cover Your Scent

Baking soda, the same stuff that deodorizes the fridge and is the key to scent-control system before a hunt.

CN7BBG empty box on white background

Take a soda shower.
The stuff can rub your skin raw if you use it straight, so mix a few tablespoons with some liquid no-scent soap.  Sometimes showering with straight unscented soap, can still leave an odor.

Make a soda-and-clothes lasagna style.
Use baking soda like any other powdered detergent to wash your clothes. Dry them, lay a few items in a plastic tote, sprinkle a layer of soda on that, put in another layer of clothing, sprinkle more soda, and so on until the tote is full. Then place an open box of baking soda in with the clothes and seal the tote up.

Sprinkle your boots.
Obviously, your feet are one of the smelliest body parts because they’re constantly sweating inside your boots,   If boots are wet with perspiration after a hunt, put them on a boot dryer and then sprinkle in some baking soda.  You’ll have very few animals cut your track after applying this tip.

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Muscle Exercises for Archery

Archery is a sport that involves the use of a bow and arrow, This sport is hundreds of years old and is even featured in the Olympics. The actions in archery utilize several main muscle groups in the body, including the triceps, which sit at the back of your upper arm, the deltoid muscles in your shoulders and the latissimus dorsi muscles in the lower back. To improve your archery skills, include exercises that target these muscles in your workout.

archery123

Raise One Arm to Boost Arm Strength

Dumbbell one-arm lateral raises strengthen the deltoid muscles, which are used to provide strength and power for holding and pulling back the bow in archery. Stand straight with your feet shoulder-width apart, your right hand holding onto a stationary object on your right and your left hand holding a dumbbell straight down so it’s resting in front of your pelvis. Slowly raise your left arm up to the side, continuing until your elbow is at shoulder-level. Lower it back down, repeat and then switch arms.

Row, Row, Row Your Muscles

Spending time on the rowing machine is well worth it if you want to improve muscles for archery, because it works all of the primary muscles used in the sport including the deltoids, latissimus dorsi and triceps. Sit on the seat with your feet strapped in securely. Keep your back straight and hold onto the handle. Slowly push off with your feet, sliding back until your legs are almost fully extended. Return to your starting position and repeat.

 

resistancebandsexercises

Go Overhead for Strong Triceps

The overhead triceps extension is one of the most effective exercises for the triceps muscles. Stand straight up with your feet close together, one slightly in front of the other and both flat on the floor. Extend your arms fully above your head, grasping the top of a dumbbell with both hands. While keeping your upper arms beside your head, slowly flex your arms, lowering your forearms behind you toward your back until you feel a light stretch in your triceps. Raise your arms back up above you to complete one rep. Repeat.

Get Big Results with the Barbell Pullover

The barbell pullover exercise targets the latissimus dorsi muscle in the back, but it also works the triceps and deltoids, making it an integral muscle exercise for archery. Lie your upper back perpendicular on a flat weight bench, your legs bent in front of you on a right angle with your feet flat on the floor. Grasp a barbell, position your arms so they’re extended straight above you and keep your hands aligned with your shoulders. While keeping your arms straight during the movement, move your arms back in a slow, controlled motion, until the barbell is directly behind your head. Then, return to your starting position. Repeat.

Why You Need the Lat Pulldown in Your Life

The latissimus dorsi is the largest muscle of the back and is one of the main muscles in the body used in archery, primarily during the drawing motion of the bow. Lat pulldown exercises are most effective for targeting this muscle, so try the cable close-grip pulldown. On the seat of a lat pulldown machine, place your feet flat on the floor below you and position your hands above you while grasping onto the parallel cable attachment. Engage your core, pull down on the cable attachment and then return it until your arms are fully extended. Repeat.

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Weights, Reps and Sets

Even with all the right exercises, if you’re not using the right amount of weight or completing the proper number of sets and reps, you’re not going to get the results you’re hoping for. Start off with a weight you can manage, and only increase the amount of weight you’re using when you can complete a full set of 12 reps while maintaining proper form the entire time. Gradually work up to completing three sets of 12 reps.

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How to Size a Black Bear

……… WHEN SIZING UP A BEAR

WawangLakeBear
A big bear swaggers and walks with attitude. He doesn’t jump at every sound like a small bear will.  A big bear doesn’t have to; he believes he’s got nothing to fear. Once you’ve spotted your bear on the bait site, it’s time to get serious about analyzing how that bear is behaving.

It is important to note that long before you judge the size of the bear, you must judge the sex of that bear and here are some things to take into consideration:

A big, old sow will have all, or more correctly, almost all of the physical characteristics of a big, old boar. She’ll have the nasty looking face that’s seen one too many years in the ring, the potbelly and the sway back.

Watch to see if the bear stands on his hind legs and rubs his back on a tree, that’s a boar.  If it walks along and straddles small trees, wiping its scent on that tree, it’s a boar.  If it stands up and breaks saplings over its shoulder, it’s a boar.  If it encounters another bear and gives chase, it’s a boar and if it is following a smaller bear, it’s a boar.

SCALE:  There is one last general appearance tip to judging black bear that makes the top three in importance, and that is scale.   A big bear looks big . . . but so does a closer, smaller bear.   Here’s a help tip on how to gauge more accurately.  If the bear is 150 yards away but the hunter thinks the bear is 200 yards away, the hunter will overestimate the bear’s relative size by somewhere near 25 percent.   In other words, the hunter is in for a serious case of ground shrink when he walks up to his bear.  TIP:  Let the bear get as close to you as possible and preferably on the bait itself.   The closer the bear, the less chance there is of misjudging the distance to relative size.

SPECIFIC TIPS FOR JUDGING BLACK BEARS: If the bear fails any one of the above general conditions, then it’s advisable to pass up on it or let the bear walk. It’s tough and you could be wrong, but at least there isn’t a dead small bear lying on the ground.   Call it a personal aversion to guilt.

BODY SHAPE:    Bigger bear are older bears, and like most of us, they don’t have the svelte bodies they once did. They tend to look “heavy” and out of shape. Remember, they monopolize the best feed and habitat, and therefore exert less energy to live.

HEAD SHAPE:   A big bear (boar) will have a deeper, wider and longer snout than a smaller bear or a female. His ears will appear to be wide apart and small. If he is aware of you and looking your way, his ears won’t stand up on top of his head like a dog’s ears, they’ll seem to be aimed out to the side of his head. A big bear will have well developed “bulging” muscles on the top of his head.


WawangBear2

LEGS:   A big bear will have massively developed front shoulders. His shoulders will look big and burly. A sow’s wrist will pinch in directly above the foot. Not so with a boar. The lower forearm, wrist and the foot on a big boar are all the same width. A big bear often appears to have shorter legs because the body is so much thicker, but keep in mind that the best-scoring bears for the records book are often the lankier looking, longer-bodied bears.

There are bear that have meatier heads; bear that look great and are great trophies, but that don’t score well.  There are others that have short skulls, block- headed beasts that look impressive, but that don’t score well at all and there are lanky, skinny bears with donkey faces that score like the devil, but that a hunter seriously looking for  a  records book bear wouldn’t walk across the street for. Black bear morphology is just too darn diversified to make a science out of judging.

The best way to hunt for a record boar is to simply shoot the bear that looks good to you and that hopefully  you’ll  appreciate all the time and effort you put in for the hunt.  If it’s got a nice hide, be happy with your animal. If it has long claws and weighs a ton, good for you and congratulations. If it isn’t as big as  you’d like, don’t fret, you’re not alone and the rug on your wall will still look great. If it happens to be one of those rare few bears that has grown a skull that qualifies for the record books, thank your guide for the good fortune that made that bear come to the bait site.

To easily judge, remember:

  • Check out the ear size in relation to the head
  • Mickey Mouse ears means a small bear.
  • Watch to see if the belly is low to the ground
  • Legs that appear short means big bear.

Watch the bear’s behavior around the bait – small bears will be skittish and afraid of a larger bruin in the area.

Look for a log around the bait and use it as a reference, check to see the length and height of the log before climbing into your stand. When the bear enters the bait site use the size of the log to help determine the overall size of the bear.

SKULL MEASURING

WawangSkull

Hope this information helps develop your judging skill on your next hunt, and,  good luck out in the field.

For further information, or, to book your next bear hunt please contact us at:
1-888-534-9217 or EMAIL

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